You Can Build Your Own Sushi Train | Hackaday

2022-06-16 08:27:28 By : Mr. Vincent Xu

According to [Garage Avenger], in Norwegian culture it’s considered impolite to ask for things to be passed across a dinner table, so much standing and reaching is the course of the day. To assist in reducing the effort required, he set about building his own sushi train device to solve the problem, giving equal condiment access to all!

The system is actually relatively simple, relying on a Wemos D1 Mini controlled by a Blynk app to run the show. Mechanically, a large drive gears is turned by a stepper motor to drive the wooden conveyor chain that actually makes up the “sushi train.” The chain links ride on a bed of Norwegian one krone coins acting as rollers.

The result is a working table-sized sushi train that really does carry plates around well. It didn’t stop people leaning over [Garage Avenger] at the dinner table, but it makes a great centerpiece on the dinner table for sharing dishes like tacos.

We’ve seen similar table technology, the Lazy Susan, around these parts before. Video after the break.

“According to [Garage Avenger], in Norwegian culture it’s considered impolite to ask for things to be passed across a dinner table, so much standing and reaching is the course of the day. To assist in reducing the effort required, he set about building his own sushi train device to solve the problem,”

Lol, changing your habits might be a bit easier fix.

But this is not the point of course. It’s just cool to make something like this, but it’s OK to say you built it just because it’s cool :P

Found this a fascinating factoid. Always assumed it was rude to lean across others instead of asking in all cultures!

In Germany it is the other way, we consider it rude reaching over someone elses plate.

They must have a way, smorgasbord serving perhaps. Get everything on your plate and then sit down. Impolite to have to ask, rude to just reach over. Smorgastrain?

Great project and entertaining video! I liked your google search history!

Very entertaining video, 2 mins in and I’d laughed out loud at least 5 times. “I was inspired by the Japanese” (clip of gameshow contestant getting crushed by rock, then someone eating nyotaimori off HIM).

That just seems like a project begging for a mop.

The use of 1 krone coins is genius. I was always fascinated by danish 25 ore coins with the holes in the middle when we were visiting relatives but never thought to use them functionally.

First thing that comes to mind is the hot dog train from that horrid aykroyd movie nothin but trouble … Pass

I admire his ingenuity but if he really wants to stop the “Norwegian Arm” then there is only one solution, duck tape your guests to their chairs!

How is it that the screw at 5:35 is free rotating? I would have thought the threads would bind and it would be sticky if not fixed.

The hole in the rotating part needs to be of a diameter larger than the threads, while the lower part has a hole that’s the size of the shaft inside the threads. Screws with a smooth upper shaft would be better.

Not that Scandinavian food is notorious for rotting fish or anything.

Anything that could potentially carry Lutfisk, Surstruming or any similar delicacy must be able to stand up to media blasting, acid washing and nuking from orbit…IMHO

Also fun: Find a way to put a 1000W motor in there. Launch food at guests. Everybody laughs.

So my daughter asked why we didn’t have one of these after her first visit to YoSushi! I now have no excuse for installing one at home.

I can see why the project was heavily inspired by Norway… the Australian dollar coin is a bit too small to use as a roller

Wow interesting! and so Fun your video! I respect your passion, may be have some more times that you make sushi train.

Won’t people just ignore everything on the belt that doesn’t have their own personal baggage tag on it? :-)

I grew up with a round table with a large lazy susan, and often had extended family meals at a relative’s house on a larger version of the same. It did make family-style shared meals (where everyone helps themselves) easier, and encouraged pleasant cooperation and communication as everyone took portions and slowly rotated the platform. One essential practice was to tuck the serving utensils to the side after use, as handles sticking straight out would begin to knock over beverages as the rotation progressed, particularly wine glasses. I still catch myself doing that on a normal table; it’s one of those things that learning the hard way leaves an impression :)

As for the style from Norwegia, a relative used to tell of a college friend eating mashed potatoes, who became fed up with rampant reaching at his eating house (it was customary to ask items to be passed in this case). When a neighbor’s arm thrust itself into his airspace, he took the forkful of potatoes he was about to eat, smacked it into the underside of the offending arm, and heartily bit down on the top. Perhaps a useful technique for conversion…

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