GSI debuts grain bin, conveyors at GEAPS Exchange | World Grain

2022-06-16 08:24:14 By : Mr. Ocean Zhou

EVO-50 bin bolt pattern. Photo courtesy of GSI.

ASSUMPTION, ILLINOIS, US — GSI introduced two new products at the 2021 GEAPS Exchange trade show Aug. 7-9 in Columbus, Ohio, US. 

The EVO-50 grain bin is engineered to keep the elements outside. 

“Our new EVO-50 design enables commercial grain operators to take control with better protection through smarter design,” said Greg Trame, director of global product management – grain for GSI.

EVO-50 bins 90 foot in diameter and larger include innovative 2x sidewall sheets to reduce vertical seams by 50% and the number of bolts by up to 50%.

Another key feature is interlaced laminated sheets. If water should get trapped between the sheets, the water will exit at the ends of the laminated sheets, reducing any chances of water getting in the bin. GSI has added a conical sealing washer to both the bolt and nut on laminated sheets, helping seal out water.

Other design benefits include tougher hardware that provides four times the corrosion protection and a watertight seal, as well as a dip-spin coating that is applied without the presence of heat, reducing the chances of hydrogen embrittlement that leads to bolt failure.

The EVO-50 design is available on stiffened bins 11 rings and taller, from 15 feet up to 156 feet in diameter.

The new GSI Select and GSI Select IS product lines allow commercial grain operators to customize their conveyors with the right sizes, layouts, capacities, options and accessories. Options are also available for commercial-grade features, such as wear liners and bearings.

“Operators have greater flexibility because each size conveyor can use a variety of chains, supporting longer conveyors than ever before,” said Mathew Tallman, global product manager – grain for GSI.

GSI Select IS, the premium line, comes standard with split sprocket for easier service, higher-end roller bearings and Class II drives with Class III upgrades. Exclusive options are hot dip galvanized or stainless steel finish, GSI’s most durable AR500 liner and S-Path alignment. GSI Select IS can also be configured as Kleen-Drag or for special commodities, such as fertilizer.

“GSI has taken its best design elements and combined them into one platform,” Tallman said. “Our new conveyor platform has been designed to provide superior craftsmanship, commercial-grade dependability and easy maintenance.”

Besides being the newest flour mill in the United States, the Ardent Mills flour mill built along the Gulf coast in metropolitan Tampa, Florida, US, has several details that set it apart. Advanced analytics, state-of-the-art equipment, unusually large grain storage capacity and unique supply chain capabilities are among the mill’s distinguishing features.

At 17,500 cwts of daily flour milling capacity, the Port Redwing mill is not Ardent Mills’ largest and is not among the 25 largest flour mills in the United States. With the capacity to receive large quantities of wheat, though, Ardent Mills constructed a large grain elevator at the Port Redwing mill, with 4.1 million bushels of storage capacity.

The elevator may be the largest ever built concurrent with the construction of a US flour mill and, according to the 2022 Grain & Milling Annual published by Sosland Publishing Co., it is the sixth largest elevator of any US flour mill currently operating. The concrete elevator includes 12, 50-foot-concrete bins with 300,000 bushels of grain storage apiece as well as a number of smaller grain bins.

Since Russia’s invasion of Ukraine in February, the world’s wheat supply has been thrown into question, with poorer nations facing scarcity and a potential food crisis, according to the United Nations.

Following are countries among the world’s least developed that are the most dependent on Russia and Ukraine for their annual wheat supply (2020), according to the UN Conference on Trade and Development. Nations in Africa import 44% of their wheat from Russia and Ukraine, according to the UN.

Sources:  unctad.org and  knoema.com/atlas.